Aldergrove Marsh Project

Open Water Habitat Restoration and Invasive Plant Removal

Completed: October 2021

Overview

  • Restored 0.6 acres of previously deep open-water habitat that had been degraded due to excessive invasive plant growth.
  • Increased functional wildlife habitat, native biodiversity, and interpretation value, and public access.
  • Increased public access by graveling of the trail along the edge of the new open-water habitat, installation of a bench, and picnic table.
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History/Location

Located on the historic Mad River and North Fork Janes Creek floodplain, the Aldergrove Marsh is a 10-acre wetland complex that was originally implemented to capture stormwater and offset wetland loss due to urbanization and industrial development in the 1980s.

The Aldergrove Marsh was locally renowned as an excellent migratory bird habitat and host to native amphibians and aquatic species. Over time, invasive reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), South American spongeplant (Limnobium laevigatum), and parrot feather (Myriophyllum aquaticum) colonized the wetland, and cattail (Typha sp.) cover expanded, dominating the site and reducing open-water habitat. The excessive plant growth caused a decrease in the dissolved oxygen levels of the water, lowering water quality, causing stress on aquatic life. 

Restoration Enhancements

Restored 0.6 acres of previously deep open-water habitat and increase functional wildlife habitat, native biodiversity, interpretation value, and public access. In addition, the funding paid for rocking of the trail along the edge of the new open-water habitat, installation of a bench, picnic table, and new signage. Future project goals include, monitoring re-colonization of native and invasive species and surveys for avian, fish and amphibian species. 

Partnership and Funding

$50,000 in funding from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Coastal Program, the Aldergrove Marsh Restoration project.