Janes Creek Meadows & Janes Creek (Downstream of 11th St.) Project

Reed Canary Grass Removal Project

Completed: 2017

Overview

  • Restored riparian and aquatic habitat that has suffered due to urbanization.
  • Removed invasive plant species and replanted the area with native trees and shrubs.
  • Served as a public outreach effort to promote invasive plant control and riparian restoration techniques.
  • Educated youth on the impacts of invasive species to local watersheds.

Before and After Removal of Reed Canary Grass

Site 1 Before Removal

janes before

Site 1 After Removal and Restoration

janes after_restoration

Site 1 After Restoration

janes after

Site 2 Before Removal

Before 2

Site 2 After

After 2

Site 3 Before Removal

janes 2 before

Site 3 Immediately After Removal

janes 2 after

Site 3 After Restoration

janes 2 after_rstoration

History/Location

Janes Creek, which once supported a healthy salmonid population, has suffered due to historical urbanization. Reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), a non-native invasive plant, severely disrupted salmonid habitat in the Janes Creek watershed by clogging the stream channel, causing sediment buildup, and reducing dissolved oxygen levels. Reed canary grass grows quickly and aggressively and within a short amount of time can outcompete native species, becoming the dominant plant in a riparian area. 

Restoration Enhancements

Arcata City staff, with the assistance of North Coast Preparatory and Performing Arts Academy students, successfully conducted the Janes Creek Restoration project, removing invasive species and replanting the area with native trees and shrubs. The goal was to restore riparian and aquatic habitat by removing reed canary grass. This project also served as a public outreach effort to promote invasive plant control and riparian restoration techniques in the hope of encouraging surrounding landowners to undertake similar efforts, as well as to educate youth on the impacts of invasive species to local watersheds. 

Partnership and Funding

This project, as well as additional reed canary grass removal projects in Arcata, was funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the CA Department of Water Resources.